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Please note that there are two different conference venues:
June 14/15 - Century City Conference Centre
June 16 - Kirstenbosch Conference Centre (transportation available)

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Poster Presentation Wine Tasting and Local Bazaar [clear filter]
Wednesday, June 14
 

18:00

Youth overcoming trauma and adversities through peer knowledge exchange workshops and peer mentorship - Don Mahleka
Youth overcoming trauma and adversities through peer knowledge exchange workshops and peer mentorship
Presenter: Don Mahleka (CYCC Network, Canada)
Introduction: Youth are experts in solutions to their own adversities while supported by caring youth agencies through the transition of being engaged as change agents in youth inaccessibility, inequality and inequity issues in the City of Toronto.
Methods: Evaluations, Youth engagement tools,
Findings:  Youth voice, Youth leadership and empowerment

Speakers

Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

A Systems Approach to Community Resilience for Coastal Cities: The Case of Multifamily Housing in New York - Katherine Gloede
A Systems Approach to Community Resilience for Coastal Cities: The Case of Multifamily Housing in New York 
Presenter: Katherine Gloede (University of Virginia School of Architecture, USA)
Introduction: Communities in multifamily rental and public housing in New York City share several climate change adaptation challenges with other coastal cities. This presentation highlights gaps between interventions addressing structural resilience and initiatives fostering psychosocial resilience. To bridge gaps, it proposes a systems approach for enhancing adaptive capacity in coastal communities.
Methods: This presentation draws on public policy, organization, and data analysis of current resilience-building initiatives for New York City’s existing multifamily housing in coastal communities. Multi-scalar graphic analysis and data visualizations highlight the gaps in current practice, and their biases toward either enhancing structural or psychosocial resilience. The disconnect displayed through these methods demonstrates the need for a systems approach to resilience that bridges climate change adaptation for the built environment with people and with nature.
Findings: Despite beneficial government-funded and grassroots interventions for New York City’s coastal multifamily housing, disconnects persist between these programs. Focusing on New York’s context offers collaborative opportunities for applying a systems approach to building community resilience in other coastal cities.   

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Gloede

Katherine Gloede

University of Virginia School of Architecture


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Abstract Young Women’s Journey towards Successful Independent Living after Leaving Residential Care - Joyce Hlungwani
Abstract Young Women’s Journey towards Successful Independent Living after Leaving Residential Care 
Presenter: Joyce Hlungwani (University of Johannesburg, South Africa)
Introduction: The transition to independent living is a challenging phase for youths who grow up in residential care. In South Africa, support services are limited, increasing these young people’s vulnerability. This paper presents qualitative findings of the resilience processes of young women who have left residential care in South Africa. 
Methods: Nine young women, aged 21 years and above, who had disengaged from the care of different children’s homes four or more years prior to the research were purposively sampled for the study. Grounded theory methods were used to analyse the data and gain insights into the social-ecological resilience processes that facilitate successful journeying towards independent living. With the resilience perspective as a theoretical lens, this paper presents the processes which the young women actively engage in, that appear to be central in facilitating a successful journey towards independent living. 
Findings/implications:   It is hoped that this research will contribute to the body of literature on women leaving care and give insight into the resiliece enhancing processes that enable young women leaving care to achieve success as they journey towards independence despite the disadvantaged position of women in society.  

Speakers
JH

Joyce Hlungwani

University of Johannesburg


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Aging "Out of Place": Mixed-Methods Exploration of Older Urban Refugees' Wellbeing in Nairobi, Kenya - Helen Miamidian
Aging "Out of Place": Mixed-Methods Exploration of Older Urban Refugees' Wellbeing in Nairobi, Kenya
Presenter: Helen Miamidian (Arcadia University, USA)
Co-Authors: Julie Tippens
Introduction: Refugees aged 50 and older constitute a growing population in cities across the globe. Despite the importance of older refugees in family cohesion, there is little attention paid to how this group fosters resilience and wellbeing. 
Methods: This paper explores resilience and mental health status in a subsample of urban refugees aged 50 and older during police surveillance and raids against urban refugees in Kenya. Locally salient interpretations of resilience (“doing better than expected” or “getting by”) were garnered through in-depth, semi-structured interviews (n=12), mental health status was assessed using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20), and stressors and supports were measured using a 14-item scale developed in-field (n=23).
Findings: Primary stressors included isolation, loss of social role, and personal insecurity. Isolation was associated with poor mental health. Resilience-enhancing resources included religious communities and spirituality. Findings suggest interventions bolstering social support, particularly within family units and religious communities, may improve older refugees’ mental health and build resilience among this population.  

Speakers
HM

Helen Miamidian

Arcadia Universty


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Analysis of National Population Policy of Ethiopia: Implication to Communities and Resilience - Yibeltal Siraneh
Analysis of National Population Policy of Ethiopia: Implication to Communities and Resilience
Presenter: Yibeltal Siraneh (Jimma University, Ethiopia)
Co-Author: Fitsum Demissie  
Introduction: Population policy is explicit or implicit measures instituted by a government to influence population size, growth, distribution or composition. Therefore, the background, rationale, goal and objectives, achievements, strength and weakness, the process, political concern and its implication on social welfare and community resilience need to be analyzed. 
Methods:  Qualitative explanatory case study design was used to analyze the NPP by document review from April 10-15, 2015.Middle range policy analysis & policy triangle approach was used to analyze the rationale of NPP, the context, content, actors and process of NPP, Political concern and its reason, its implication in terms of equity & social welfare, major achievements, strength & weakness, challenges and opportunities of the NPP.Data processing & analysis was made based on policy analysis science after reviewing the NPP document, interviewing experts and other related literatures.
Findings:  Rapid population growth, young age structure and the uneven spatial distribution were the major factors for the rationale of NPP. It was processed by pluralism perspective. It has high political concern because operates at systemic level with over all goal of rapid reduction of fertility rate. It created resilient community. 
 

Speakers

Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Assessment of Community Resilience with Complex Network Perspective - Junqing Tang
Assessment of Community Resilience with Complex Network Perspective
Presenter: Junqing Tang (Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ), Singapore)
Co-Authors: Hans Rudolf Heinimann  
Introduction: Community resilience of different scenarios and performance can hardly be effectively assessed and improved, and most existing studies address the community resilience in conceptual, macroscopic and statical ways. Therefore, an emerging method and an approach that can assess microscopic resilience in a complex network is in need.
Methods: We proposed a performance-based generic metric and novelly established a "drawdowns-drawups" analytical method to quantify resilience at microscopic level. By bolting on six elemental functions: robustness range, elasticity threshold, recovery scenario, recovery magnitude, recovery time and resistance effort, it provides a significant illustration of performance adaptability. In modelling section, we conducted a pilot study and constructed a proxy network model to simulate possible individual relationship in community. The proxy model was constructed based on large historical data of companies listed in London Stock Exchange. Time-series performance data of companies were analysed and the community evolutionary and clustering pattern were visualised.
Findings: (a) The new method is effective for resilience assessment, and the metric helps to understand the resilience complexity. (b) The dynamic resilience indices have a certain power-law-distributed feature. It may implicate the resilience complexity could be revealed by simple mathematical distributions. (c) Community network has "fusion-fission" resilient behaviour.  

Speakers
JT

Junqing Tang

Singapore-ETH Centre


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Building resilience through the healthcare system: healthcare practitioner and HIV positive adolescent user’s perspectives - Nataly Woollett
Building resilience through the healthcare system: healthcare practitioner and HIV positive adolescent user’s perspectives
Presenter: Nataly Woollett (University of Witwatersrand, South Africa)
Co-Authors: Kirsten Thomson, Shenaaz Pahad
Introduction: Resilience is crucial in managing HIV positive adolescents and studies confirm that resilience can be promoted through effective programming. Healthcare practitioners and HIV infected adolescents offer valuable perspectives on how to foster resilience in adolescent patients, concurrently strengthening the healthcare system and mitigating risk for youth, who face compounded vulnerabilities.
Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with healthcare practitioners and international experts working directly with HIV positive adolescents (n=30) and HIV positive adolescents accessing care (n=25) in Johannesburg public health clinics. Participants identified resilience building elements that could benefit adolescents using the public healthcare system in South Africa. Data was analysed in NVIVO 10 using a thematic approach to coding.
Findings: Recommendations included: adolescent clinics that utilized a rights-based approach, sexual reproductive health services and psychosocial support for adolescents and their caregivers at facilities. Practitioners advocated adopting legal frameworks that protect adolescents’ inheritance, guardianship and income grants. Skills building activities and health service provision at community and school level was emphasised.   

Speakers
NW

Nataly Woollett

University of Witwatersrand, School of Clinical Medicine


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Caregiver Resilience and Social Support for Family Caregivers of PLWHIV in Kenya - Jane Rose Njue (for Lucy Kathuri-Ogola)
Caregiver Resilience and Social Support for Family Caregivers of PLWHIV in Kenya
Presenter: Jane Rose Njue (Northern Illinois University)
Co-Authors: Lucy Kathuri-Ogola, Joan Kabaria Muriithi
Introduction: 

The increase in PLWHA and the burden of sickness caused by the HIV epidemic places great demands on families and communities in Kenya. This paper is grounded on family resilience theory and avers that belief systems, organizational patterns and problem-solving mechanisms play a vital role in bolstering caregiver resilience.


Methods: 

The discussions in this paper are anchored on the findings of a study that was carried out in Thika District, Kenya. A survey research design was employed. The study area provided rural and urban contexts. A sample of 177 primary family caregivers (FCGs) of PLWHIV was used. Data was collected using interview schedules for FCGs and Focus Group Discussions with community health workers. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS while thematic analysis was applied for the qualitative data. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used.

Findings: As FCGs play multifaceted roles they face challenges including lack of adequate finances, food provision difficulties, stress and stigma. To cope, the FCGs rely on a sense of hope, spirituality, connectedness, and collaborative problem-solving. Although the situation could be tough, the community provides an environment of hope that builds resilience. 

Speakers
JR

Jane Rose Njue

Family and Consumer Sciences


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Children living in mixed status households - Amber Martinez
Children living in mixed status households 
Presenter: Amber Martinez (Chicago School of Professional Psychology, USA)
Introduction: Exploring the lives and missed opportunities for support services in children living in mixed status households (one or more parent lacks legal status) in the U.S. and the effects upon them during parental deportation 
Methods: Mixed methods-quasi experimental   Qualitative interviews and survey
Findings: Children in this population lack access to public programs targeted to promote resilience such as preschool, pediatric routine well child exams and immunizations and public supplemental food programs (WIC, food stamps, emergency food boxes) and after school programs due to parental fear of being discovered and resulting deportation.

Speakers
AM

Amber Martinez

PhD Candidate, International Psychology
PhD Candidate International Psychology (Trauma)_x000D_ Child Welfare (domestic and international)_x000D_ Child Advocate (CASA)_x000D_ Child Life Specialist (volunteer)_x000D_ Founder of Children's International non-profit_x000D_ Lobbyist for Children's rights and causes _x000D_ Advocate... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Children shaping their world: an international network of child participatory research projects - Lisa Gibbs
Children shaping their world: an international network of child participatory research projects
Presenter: Lisa Gibbs (University of Melbourne, Australia)
Introduction: Involving children as co-researchers in participatory health research projects has been associated with a range of benefits likely to promote wellbeing and resilience including self esteem, self efficacy, self control, sensitivity to the perspective of others, hope for the future, democratic decision making, and active citizenship (Malone & Hartung 2010).
Methods: The Kids in Action network was launched in September 2016 by the International Collaboration for Participatory Health Research and coordinated from the University of Melbourne, Australia to support projects, to increase the profile of participatory research with children, to provide a platform for shared learning and development of these methods, to consider how best to measure impacts, and to co-generate resources to share with others to support the use of participatory health research with children.
Findings: There are already approximately 30 projects and supporting members registered across 5 continents and potential for the Kids in Action network to act as a platform for child input into global issues impacting on health, wellbeing and resilience.   

Speakers
LG

Lisa Gibbs

University of Melbourne


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Conceptual models of resilience. A systematic review - Maria Llistosella-Piñero
Conceptual models of resilience. A systematic review
Presenter: Maria Llistosella-Piñero (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain)
Co-Authors: Carolina Baeza-Velasco , Teres Gutiérrez Rosado, Carmen Pérez-Ventana, Joaquim Limonero 
Introduction: Several works have revised the dynamic construct of resilience, however there is a lack in literature concerning revisions with a systematic approach. The aim of the present study is to carry out a systematic review of the concept of resilience.
Methods: Two independent researchers conducted a methodological review using systematic principles for searching, screening and assessing quality criteria and data extraction. Published articles in English and Spanish were reviewed up to May 2016 in bibliographic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of science (ISI), Cochrane Plus and BIREME (SCIELO, LILACS, IBECS), Psyco INFO. The key words used for the search were selected previously by a group of experts on resilience  
Findings: 298 abstracts were screened by one person and checked by a second. 57 articles were retrieved and reviewed to assess the quality and eligibility criteria. We used a checklist for assessing which was adapted from the handbook for systematic reviews. The results of this study are in progress  

Speakers
ML

Maria Llistosella Piñero

Maria Llistosella Piñero, native of Barcelona, 32 years old. Ten years of experience how nurse pediatric and community, working in a primary care center. Associate Professor of the "Escola Universitària d'Infermeria and therapy Ocupasional of Terrassa, attached to the Universitat... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Conceptualizing Resilience: Lone mothers’ understanding and experiences of resiliency - Sara Cumming
Conceptualizing Resilience: Lone mothers’ understanding and experiences of resiliency
Presenter: Sara Cumming (Sheridan College, Canada)
Co-Authors: Lea Caragata, Elizabeth Watters  
Introduction: Women in Canada currently face a gendered labour market and a decrease in the availability of state benefits. In spite of these realities, some cope exceptionally well with very significant levels of adversity. Understanding what contributes to these resilient and adaptive behaviours is critical to effective and targeted policy formulation.
Methods: This study examined resilience among immigrant and Canadian-born lone mothers living in poverty. It drew upon earlier research (2005-2010) conducted as part of five-year community university research alliance (CURA), and involved new data collection with 38 lone mothers in three cities across Canada. Eighteen lone mothers women who were involved as research assistants in the CURA project participated in focus groups to explore the meaning of resilience as well as perceived protective factors and types of adversity. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with a total of 20 lone mothers in the three sites.
Findings: The findings support Masten’s (2007) understanding of resiliency as related to three kinds of phenomena: good outcomes despite high-risk status, sustained competence under threat, and recovery from trauma. However we argue that there is a fourth phenomenon which we label ‘overcoming a setback’.   

Speakers
SJ

Sara J. Cumming

Sheridan College


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Developmental cascades between mental health and academic attainment in late childhood - Neil Humphrey
Developmental cascades between mental health and academic attainment in late childhood
Presenter: Neil Humphrey (University of Manchester, UK)
Co-Authors: Margarita Panayiotou
Introduction: Developmental cascades research explores how functioning in one domain is related to functioning in other domains over time. We examine such longitudinal relationships between emotional symptoms, conduct problems, and reading performance. Three hypotheses are tested — adjustment erosion, academic incompetence, and (cumulative) shared risk.
Methods: Participants were 1842 children (aged 8-9; 979 male, 863 female) drawn from 16 schools in England. Mental health (emotional symptoms, conduct problems - teacher SDQ) and academic attainment (reading - InCAS) data were collected on an annual basis for 3 years. Cumulative shared risk data comprised: familial poverty (free school meal eligibility), neighbourhood deprivation (index of deprivation affecting children), special educational needs (school records), disengagement from school, and lack of social/peer support (KidScreen 27). Data were analysed using cross lag, multi-level structural equation models. Analyses suggested that gender moderated cascade pathways, so separate models were produced for males and females.
Frindings: After accounting for temporal stability, data clustering, within-time co-variance, and cumulative shared risk, the female model supported the academic incompetence hypothesis (e.g. difficulties in reading predicting later increases in emotional symptoms). The male model supported the adjustment erosion hypothesis (e.g. conduct problems predicting later reductions in reading scores).   

Speakers
NH

Neil Humphrey

University of Manchester


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Disaster Resilience Leadership Trained Practitioner: A Short Term Leadership Training Program Resulted in Tangible Leadership Actions in East Africa - Christine Muhumuza
Disaster Resilience Leadership Trained Practitioner: A Short Term Leadership Training Program Resulted in Tangible Leadership Actions in East Africa
Presenter: Christine Muhumuza (MakSPH RAN, Uganda)
Co-Authors: Roy william Bazeyo, Roy William Mayega, Doreen Tuhehebwe 
Introduction: There is an increasing number and intensity of disaster incidents which impose an immeasurable scale of impacts to the population. However it has been observed that there is lack of effective leadership and adequate knowledge in disaster risk management (DRM) & resilience among ground level practitioners and first line responders. 
Methods: We tested how a capacity building program can support practitioners achieve tangible DRM leadership actions within their organizations of work. This was through a series of 5-day workshop that focused on 4 core pillars (Operations, Leadership and Human Factors, Climate change, and Analytics) and was attended by nominated DRL fellows.
Findings:  A total of 40 DRL fellows were trained from 6 Eastern Africa countries (Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia). Fellows came from organizations such as government ministries & agencies, NGOs, CSOs, academia, UN agencies, security forces and the private sector. Each DRL fellow implemented an action plan among others.   

Speakers
CM

Christine Muhumuza

Research Manager, RESILIENTAFRICA NETWORK (RAN)
Christine is a research fellow, and a research manager for Resilience African Network (RAN) in the Department of Epidemiology and Bio-statistics at the School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. Christine has extensive professional... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Does what doesn’t kill them, makes them stronger? On first and second level violence-resilience in adolescence - Wassilis Kassis (for Sibylle Artz)
Does what doesn’t kill them, makes them stronger? On first and second level violence-resilience in adolescence
Presenter: Wassilis Kassis (Zurich University of Teacher Education, Switzerland)
Co-Authors: Sibylle Artz
Introduction: About 30% of the adolescents’ experience physical violence in their families. Family violence is implicated in social, not just individual problems; resilience research should therefore examine the relationship between core resilience criteria like (first level resilience) and context dependent factors for modelling a contextualized resilience approach (second level resilience).
Methods: Our (2009-2011) European Commission Daphne III Programme funded questionnaire-based study of 5,143 adolescents (age 14.5), shows that nearly every fourth respondent (23.0%) had been physically abused by his or her parents and almost every sixth respondent (17.3%) had witnessed physical spousal abuse. These data also showed that the chances of remaining violence and/or depression free diminish as the exposure to family violence increases, and that “resilient” adolescents who are violence and depression free despite experiencing physical family violence, were doing significantly worse where school, substance abuse, self-acceptance and optimistic views of the future are concerned than the non-violence exposed participants.
Findings: A single focus based definition for resilience premised merely on the absence of undesirable behaviour is not a sufficient indicator for a positive social and personal development. Thus resilience should be defined not only on individual factors, but also on a range of ecological factors like family, school, and peers.   

Speakers
WK

Wassilis Kassis

Zurich University of Teacher Education


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Exploring the Resilience Factors of Immigrant Wives in the Process of Overcoming Cultural Adaptation - Yi-Chen Jenny Wu
Exploring the Resilience Factors of Immigrant Wives in the Process of Overcoming Cultural Adaptation
Presenter: Yi-Chen Jenny Wu (National Tsing Hua University, ROC)
Co-Authors: Yu-Jun Zheng, Jin-Xuan Chen  
Introduction: Past research showed the disadvantages of immigrant wives in Taiwan, including acculturation difficulties and discrimination, however, media began to portray images of successful immigrant wives to change the stereotype that they were weak. Thus, we aimed to explore resilience factors that help these women overcome challenges while beginning a new life in Taiwan.
Methods: This study used phenomenological-based qualitative research method to understand acculturation experiences of immigrant wives in Taiwan. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 6 immigrant wives who have been able to build their new identify and feel settled in Taiwan. These verbal interviews were transcribed into written manuscripts. Using content analysis to look for resilience factors, key themes and topics were identified and organized into groups. Through rereading and reorganizing, we formed these groups into a structure that portray the experiences of immigrant wives in Taiwan that demonstrate their resilience and strengths.
Findings: The results showed that these immigrant women were able to overcome difficulties when they relied on their resilience factors: Their interpersonal and social networking skills, learning ability, professional skills, skills to meet their needs, and openness attitude. These factors also help them strengthen their self-identity in Taiwan.  

Speakers
YW

Yi-Chen Wu

National Hsing-Hua University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Exploring Understanding of Risk and Protective Factors in Relation to Resilience Building for Children in Jakarta, Indonesia - Emily Stapley (for Evelyn Sharples)
Exploring Understanding of Risk and Protective Factors in Relation to Resilience Building for Children in Jakarta, Indonesia
Presenter: Emily Stapley (Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, UK)
Co-Authors: Evelyn Sharples, Jessica Deighton, Panos Vostanis
Introduction: Recent studies emphasise the importance of avoiding simply imposing western biomedical or psychological interventions, which are not sensitive to cultures and communities. Therefore, this project aimed to explore cultural and contextual differences in the understanding of resilience for children affected by trauma.
Methods: Data were collected during a one week field trip to Jakarta, Indonesia. Observational notes were taken at one care home and at a training session for care workers. A focus group was conducted with six 11-12 year olds where notes were taken with the assistance of a translator, and three semi-structured interviews were conducted with care workers attending the training session. Data were also collected from an online survey consisting of two open-ended questions taken by 121 psychology students attending a seminar. Theoretical thematic analysis was used to explore understanding of risk and protective factors and semantic themes identified. 
Findings: Identified risk and protective factors were identified to explore the convergences and divergences between Indonesian and British ideas and conceptualisation of risk and resilience.  Limitations of such a cross-culture scoping study have been noted. This research has implications for the universal nature of interventions and measures used.

Speakers
ES

Emily Stapley

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Family protective factors responsible for satisfaction with family of youth with behavioral problems - Martina Ferić

Title: Family protective factors responsible fo satisfaction with family of youth with behavioral problems
Speaker:
Martina Ferić (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Eduction and Rehabilitation Sciences, Croatia)
Co-Authors: Ivana Maurović, Antonija Žiža, Valentina Kranźelić,
Introduction: Families of youth with behavioural problems are often seen as an environment burdened with risk factors, rather than environment that can be source of protective factors. The aim of this paper is to determine the contribution of family protective factors in explaining satisfaction with family of youth with behavioural problems.
Methods: This paper is a part of a pilot research of the project Specific characteristics of families at risk: contribution to complex interventions planning that is carried out by Faculty of Education and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Zagreb, Croatia.Study was conducted with a 115 youth (73.4% male) from 12 to 19 years old, that are, due to behavioural problems, beneficiary of social welfare interventions. Following instruments were applied: Sociodemographic questionnaire, Adapted version of Family Resilience Assessment Scale (Sixbey, 2005), Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale (Olson, 2010).    Data were analysed via by descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis.
Findings: Results indicate a relatively high level of satisfaction with a family life of youth with behavioural problems, as well as high level of assessed protective factors in family environment. Important contributors of family life satisfaction are family communication, cohesion, understanding/problem solving and use of social and economic resources. 


Speakers

Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

From challenges to disruptive innovation: Understanding the journey of resilience in an entrepreneur disrupting the private security industry - Paul Lim
From challenges to disruptive innovation: Understanding the journey of resilience in an entrepreneur disrupting the private security industry
Speaker: Paul Lim (Singapore Management University, Singapore)
Introduction: Innovative disruptors are applauded yet hated concurrently. The journey overcoming governmental, industrial and customer roadblocks is difficult. How does one then go on to disrupt a whole industry locally, and potentially worldwide? This in-depth study seeks to provide a deeper understanding into how an individual achieved disruption despite numerous roadblocks.
Methods:  This study utilises a descriptive case study research approach. A case study protocol of procedures and rules was created before data collection. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over four and a half hours, over a period of two sessions, in one and a half months. The researcher audio recorded the interview whilst directly observing the individual’s behaviour. A research assistant took notes and converted the audio recordings into a transcript. Secondary sources of data such as newspaper clippings on the individual were used to cross-reference with his interview statements. Additionally, the individual also completed the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) survey.  
Findings:  The data is in the midst of being processed. One finding is the results of the CD-RISC survey. The highest ratings for all items were scored except for one middle rating in resourcefulness. Understanding his journey will help identify and educate individuals who are potential disruptors.

Speakers
PL

Paul Lim

singapore management university


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

How to improve the measurement of family routines in a diverse world: An ecocultural perspective - Christine de Goede
How to improve the measurement of family routines in a diverse world: An ecocultural perspective.
Presenter: Christine de Goede (Stellenbosch University, South Africa)
Co-Authors: Awie Greeff
Introduction: The family routine is a vital resilience resource with numerous likely mechanisms affecting parent and child outcomes. For example, routines can provide structure and reduce home chaos; routines are cultural maps that guide parental behavior change during life transitions; and family-time routines foster relational bonding, emotional expression and meaning making. 
Methods: Although ecological-cultural niche (ecocultural) theory, as devised by Weisner and associates, is a relatively well-known theoretical framework, we believe a closer examination of its components inspires new avenues in research, especially how we measure family routines. By giving practical examples, we aim to highlight the need for more culturally sensitive self-report questionnaires. We also implore researchers to use mixed method approaches and suggest a few that could deliver promising results. We also suggest how new technologies can augment traditional data collection techniques. 
Findings: In essence, an ecocultural framework supports a more context specific understanding of routines, taking into account how distal cultural, historical, environmental and economic complexities shape everyday, proximate interactions. This framework compels us to revise the use of traditional self-report questionnaires that miss the cultural and practical nuances of family routines. 

Speakers
CD

Christine de Goede

Stellenbosch University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Human Centered and Context Specific Co-Innovation of Resilience Factors: The Case of the Goat Value Chain in Dikgale - Doreen Mnyulwa
Human Centered and Context Specific Co-Innovation of Resilience Factors: The Case of the Goat Value Chain in Dikgale. 
Presenter: Doreen Mnyulwa (RAEIN-Africa, South Africa)
Co-Authors: Alice Maredza 
Introduction: Livestock farming is one of the resilience factors of the study area Digkale District in Limpopo, South Africa.  One of the available resource, goats, do not make a significant contribution to the incomes of the farmers. Furthermore, farmers lack the capacity to diversify goat value chains to improve income generation. 
Methods: The research employed  human centred, context specific and co-innovation approaches. The method used for the exploration of the problem situation and context (needs finding), was secondary data analysis coupled with ethnography for collection of empirical data. Ethnographic techniques used included reconnaissance surveys, key informants’ informal interviews, Focus Group Discussions, Individual In-depth Interviews, observations, and Rapid Rural Appraisal tools and techniques. These methods unraveled insights into the target community context and resilience in relation to goat value chain. Data collected informed problem reframing and concept refinement. Co-innovation was employed to generate the bundle of innovations that will enhance goat value chain. 
Findings: Thus the G4P identified narrow visioning, and cultural, technological, capacity and market limitations to goat commercialization.  As generic technological innovation for resilience have been explored elsewhere and failed, this project focused on co-innovated, human centered and contextually responsive bundle of prototypes to improve goat production, processing and commercialization. 

Speakers
DM

Doreen Mnyulwa

RAEIN-Africa


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

I Am Because We Are: Resilience in Children who are Victims of Domestic Violence Through the Lens of Ubuntu - Tedi Kennedy
I Am Because We Are: Resilience in Children who are Victims of Domestic Violence Through the Lens of Ubuntu
Presenter: Tedi Kennedy (University of Amsterdam, USA)
Introduction: This paper addresses the role ubuntu plays in children’s ability to develop their resilience in the face of domestic abuse. In the theoretical framework of the research, the social ecological model serves as a reminder that children do not grow up in a vacuum and are socialized by their environment. 
Methods: The paper is based on empirical research carried out in Gugulethu, South Africa in 2016, using four distinct research methods. The first being the Child and Youth Resilience Measure created by the Resilience Research Centre. A photo elicitation process and finally an interview followed the survey. Focus groups were also conducted with caregivers within the community
Findings: At the moment, concrete findings for the research are still being analyzed and interpreted; however, preliminary findings show that ubuntu plays a role, but not necessarily the main factor behind resilience in children. The community within Gugulethu may influence children’s ability to develop resilience more so than ubuntu. 

Speakers
avatar for Tedi Kennedy

Tedi Kennedy

University of Amsterdam


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

I-Click Photography: Capturing perspectives to promote resilient environments - Cassandra Monette
I-Click Photography: Capturing perspectives to promote resilient environments
Presenter: Cassandra Monette  (Concordia University, Canada)
Co-Author: Harriet Petrakos
Introduction: Students with emotional/behavioural difficulties tend to have lower rates of academic success (Kauffman, 2008). Understanding how students’ perceptions and environments play a role in their learning can help to facilitate the development of effective intervention programs that seek to promote resilient environments and support and success for all learners.
Methods: In collaboration with the teachers and parents, a photography project took place at an elementary school in Canada. Seven students from grade one to six, who have socio-emotional difficulties took photographs of what was important to them about learning. Students were interviewed about their photographs and invited to share their stories with their community through a photo exhibition. Focus groups with teachers and school staff were also conducted prior to and after the photography club began in order to understand how these students were being perceived. 
Findings: Using grounded theory, this study explores emerging themes from three student case studies and from teacher focus groups to understand the strengths and challenges that these children were perceived to have, as well as how each of these children engaged with photography as a self-expression tool.   

Speakers
CM

Cassandra Monette

Concordia University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Identifying the Barriers to, and Facilitators of Resilience Based Practice on Outcomes for Pupils with Complex Needs - Elaine Rogers (for Stephanie Coombe)
Identifying the Barriers to, and Facilitators of Resilience Based Practice on Outcomes for Pupils with Complex Needs
Presenter: Elaine Rogers (Eleanor Smith School, UK)
Co-Authors: Stephanie Coombe, Angie Hart, Sharon Clayton, Julie Rowland,  Graham Smith
Introduction: Whole school approaches that involve all staff, regardless of role, and include pupils with complex needs are scarce. Pupils with complex needs are typically excluded from resilience promoting research. This work differs in its co-produced focus and involvement of those most affected by decisions made about them.
Methods: Mixed methods were used with staff and pupils. A creative, arts based approach (body mapping) was used with pupils, along with a collaborative inquiry with staff, based on an action research methodology. ALL staff were involved in the research, regardless of role; including the cook and cleaner, along with teaching staff, support staff and senior leaders. Quantitative data, in the form of school attendance and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) scores were used to triangulate the thematic analysis findings from the qualitative methods. 
Findings: Data indicated a positive impact on school attendance, and social and emotional progress made by pupils, specifically in the areas of the importance of one significant adult, relationships and school ethos. A whole school approach that recognises the impact of small resilient moves on pupil difficulties is recommended.  

Speakers
ER

Elaine Rogers

Inclusion Mangaer, Eleanor Smith School


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Impacts of Child Protection Proceedings on Resilience of Children an Families - Ursula Leuthold
Impacts of Child Protection Proceedings on Resilience of Children an Families
Presenter: Ursula Leuthold (University of applied science Lucern, Switzerland)
Introduction: In Switzerland and the US authorities take action into the privacy of families to protect children from harm. Child protection compound legal aspects as well as general values of the dominant culture and assumption why families experience difficulties. It is asked: What impacts have different child protection systems on resilience? 
Methods: The approach to the research question is a qualitative one. Through semi-structured interviews with child protection workers in the US and Switzerland different rationalities in the proceedings have been identified. In reference to the social ecological definition of resilience (Ungar & Liebenberg, 2011) the impact on the processes of navigation and negotiation of children and families are interpreted.
Findings: The hypotheses are that a wide discretion and a tendency to prefer consensual solutions build on a trusting relationship between families and social worker. Making meaningful resources available/ accessible and facilitate navigation is emphasized. A lack of clarity in responsibilities and decision power hinders negotiation processes for children and families.  

Speakers
avatar for Ursula Leuthold

Ursula Leuthold

Lecturer, University of applied sience Lucern (HSLU)


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Intergenerational transmission of trauma and resilience: Biological and sociocultural narratives - Angela Veale
Intergenerational transmission of trauma and resilience: Biological and sociocultural narratives
Presenter: Angela Veale (University College Cork, Ireland)
Co-Authors: Samantha Dockray 
Introduction: The individual and community experience of disasters are reasonably well-described, but how disaster experiences reverberate between people is under-examined.
Psychobiological models of familial attunements of response to experience, and examinations of community-cultural narratives of trauma have indicated the potential for harrowing experiences to be psychobiologically and socio-interpersonally transmitted across generations.  
Methods: Methodologically, this research amalgamates two previously distinct strategies to map psychobiological resilience and recover by plotting psychobiological and social responses to trauma, as they may be echoed or amplified across generations.  Families where one family member was involved in a disaster such as the Stardust Fire (Ireland), and have two other generations willing to participate, will be recruited; the research will be conducted in partnership with the commemorative committee. Narrative interviews, a tool to explore intergenerational transmission as it illuminates how people experience events and form narratives (McAdams, 2005; Crossley, 2007) 
Findings: The contribution of this research is to gain greater understanding of the correlates between biological and psychological responses to trauma, in particular the intergenerational transmission of resiliency and vulnerability across multiple interactive systems (psychobiological stress reactivity) and at multiple levels (the person, family and community).  

Speakers
AV

Angela Veale

University College Cork
Dr. at UCC As a researcher, Dr. Veale aims to contribute in the space between academic knowledge, policy and practice. She is interested in innovative and mixed research methodologies, in particular working with creative research methods. Her research and writing takes a socio-cultural... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Measuring perceptions of self – a novel idiographic methodology for measurement of change at an intra-individual level. - Sarah Robinson (for Emma Hurley)
Measuring perceptions of self – A novel idiographic methodology for measurement of change at an intra-individual level.
Presenter: Sarah Robinson (UCC, Ireland)
Co-Authors: Emma Hurley,  Raegan Murphy
Introduction: The measurement of intra-individual change has proven to be particularly challenging from an evidence-based perspective. Viewing the person as a dynamic system provides a context for research and allows us to examine how that person changes when an element, such as an intervention, is introduced into that unique system. 
Methods: This presentation outlines a methodology that provides information-rich feedback to the clinician while also providing a measure of change of the person over time. Open card sorts are used to generate a snapshot of how the person views their world and their place in it with regard to constructs elicited. Information gathered is analysed using multidimensional scaling, producing a life-space map, a two-dimensional depiction of the person and how they view themselves in relation to other people in their world. How the person perceives themselves can be interpreted by the clinician in terms of self-esteem, self-efficacy, intelligence, likability etc
Findings: Life space maps gathered over the course of the intervention are then subject to General Procrustes Analysis (GPA) which allows for degrees of change to be measured over time. Studies indicate this methodology achieves the goal of an assessment methodology that satisfies the requirements of practitioners and researchers alike.   

Speakers
SR

Sarah Robinson

School of Applied Psychology, University College Cork
Sarah Robinson is a first year PHD candidate in the University College Cork (UCC), Republic of Ireland. She is interesed in community and critical psychology, post-conflict and conflict transitions, life transitions and resilience, and humanitarianism. She is a graduate of the higher... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Networks for change and Well-being: Girl-led and Boy-led ‘from the ground up’ policy-making to address sexual violence in South Africa - Yolande Coetzer
Networks for change and Well-being: Girl-led and Boy-led ‘from the ground up’ policy-making to address sexual violence in South Africa
Presenter: Yolande Coetzer (South Africa)
Co-Author: Mosna Khaile, Marco Ebersohn
Introduction: This phenomenological study applied visual participatory methods to explore the social ecology of resilience in a Free State community. The aim of this study was to understand the messages indigenous young women/men have regarding how their community can better protect them against violence. 
Methods: Five indigenous young women and five indigenous young men, between the ages of 18 – 24, were recruited by social workers collaborating with the South African Networks for Change Project. Preliminary findings suggest that participatory visual methodology is a valuable pathway in understanding the messages indigenous young women/men have relating to protection against violence in their communities, in amplifying their messages as well as building a platform where these young adults can negotiate for specific resources and advocate for change regarding violence experienced in their community - thus potentially promoting resilience processes in these young adults and their community. 
Findings: However, further phases in the study must be completed before any conclusions can be made regarding whether or not participatory visual methodology is a strong enough pathway to bring about the advocated changes within the social ecology of these young adults.  

Speakers
avatar for Yolande Coetzer

Yolande Coetzer

Master's Student, NWU - Vaal Triangle
I am currently studying towards my Master's degree in Applied Positive Psychology. My area of research focuses on how communities can better protect historically disadvantaged young men and women against violence., instead of only focusing on the risk factors in their community. The... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Overcoming past and present traumas through family resiliency: “we see it as mental well-being not mental health”. - Charity Mokgaetji Somo
Overcoming past and present traumas through family resiliency: “we see it as mental well-being not mental health”.
Presenter: Charity Mokgaetji Somo (University of Georgia, USA)
Co-Author: Desiree Seponski 
Introduction: Refugee families face incredibly traumatic experiences at home, during relocation to and resettlement in the host country. Researchers and interventionists focus on challenges to family health without paying attention to how these families have shown the ability to bounce back from adversity and become resourceful to themselves and their community. 
Methods: We conducted a needs assessment on the mental wellbeing of refugee families by facilitating two focus group discussions, 1) with refugee center stakeholders, 2) with refugee community stakeholders. The aim of the focus groups was to engage these stakeholders around the mental health outcomes of newly arriving refugees in the United States as well as to conduct a summative evaluation of the refugee responsive series that was previously implemented by the researchers. The data was analysed through content thematic analysis in order to classify the information into themes that will inform the mental wellbeing intervention program in that community 
Findings: The overarching theme was that it is better to refer to mental health as mental wellbeing; mental health implies pathology while well-being does NOT confine families to a diagnosis. Among several themes that emerged, participants reported that they have indigenous cultural ways they implement to adapt to overcome their traumas.   

Speakers
CS

Charity Somo

University of Georgia


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Police Training and Resilience - Jonas Hansson
Police Training and Resilience
Presenter: Jonas Hansson (Umeå University, Sweden)
Co-Author:  Mehdi Ghazinour, Annika Johansson,  Maria Liljeholm-Bång,  Carina Lindgren
Introduction:  Police officers are burdened with numerous stressors, ranging from potentially traumatic critical incidents to organizational issues. Resilience is personal characteristics that moderates negative effects of such stress and endorses adaptation. 
Methods:  A longitudinal design was used to investigate resilience among police students in relation to sociodemographic background variables, education and life events. We used a Swedish version of the Resilience Scale, originally created by Wagnild and Young (1993). The participants were male and female students recently registered at the Basic Training Program for Police Officers. The Resilience Scale questionnaire consists of 25 items on a seven-point Likert scale, the higher the score, the stronger resilience. 
Findings:  Findings discussed regarding the prevention program consisted of mental preparedness, communication, conflict management, and weapon and tactical training, and was measured by visual analogue scales (VAS) within the context of police education and police work in Sweden. This research extends our knowledge of how resilience is affected by the prevention program. 
 

Speakers
JH

Jonas Hansson

Basic Training Programme for Police Officers, Umeå University, Sweden


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Promoting Resilience through MECIR: Community-Based Qualitative Research with Mapuche Families Facing Overlapping Disasters - Devin G. Atallah
Exploring and Promoting Resilience through MECIR: Community-Based Qualitative Research with Mapuche Families Facing Overlapping Disasters
Presenter: Devin G. Atallah (National Research Center for Integrated Natural Disaster Management (CIGIDEN), Chile)
Introduction: Exploring and Promoting Resilience through MECIR (Mapuche Equipo Comunitario de Investigación de la Resiliencia), is a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) project that focuses on understanding and promoting resilience in Mapuche communities - the most populous first nation of Chile.
Methods: Chile is marked by the recurrence of socionatural disasters, including earthquakes, volcano eruptions, and tsunamis. Resilience in Mapuche communities, however, is not only marked by ‘rapid onset’ disasters, but also by systematic marginalization and daily ‘slow onset’ sociopolitical disasters such as: histories of settler colonization and ongoing structural racisms. Therefore, this presentation explores how the MECIR project contributes to re-conceptualizations of resilience from indigenous perspectives exploring historically- and contextually-informed community protective pathways.
Findings: MECIR connects knowledge with action by engaging in community outreach and intervention recommendations through asset mapping. This presentation shares preliminary findings from MECIR, particularly initial community outreach and asset mapping processes, contributing to understandings of resilience, community engagement strategies, and decolonial qualitative methods with indigenous communities through a CBPR approach.

Speakers
avatar for Devin Atallah

Devin Atallah

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, The Chilean National Research Center for Integrated Natural Disaster Management (CIGIDEN)
Devin G. Atallah, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral fellow at CIGIDEN in Santiago, Chile. His published work focuses on trauma and resilience processes in children, youth, and families from marginalized communities and racialized and indigenous groups facing significant adversities such as... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Qualitative Assessment of Resilience to the Effects of Climate Variability in the Three Communities in Uganda - Nathan Tumuhamye
Qualitative Assessment of Resilience to the Effects of Climate Variability in the Three Communities in Uganda
Presenter: Nathan Tumuhamye (ResilientAfrica Network, Uganda)
Co-Authors: Bazeyo William, Roy William Mayega, Julius Ssentongo
Introduction: Uganda is vulnerable to climate variability including increased frequency and intensity of rainfall, droughts and floods. Three sub-regions, Albertine in the western part of the country and Teso and Mt. Elgon in the east, suffer from recurrent floods, with resulting destruction of crops and infrastructure, water contamination and disease outbreaks
Methods: Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), were conducted in the local language. FGD participants were mobilized by sub-county focal persons (Community Development Officers) from the most affected parishes and included youths, women’s group representatives, local opinion leaders, local cultural leader, local political leaders and other community members affected by climate variability.
Findings: The main shocks and stresses resulting from floods, drought and landslides in the three subregions are environmental degradation, poverty, food insecurity, damaged infrastructure and increased morbidity and mortality.   

Speakers
TN

Tumuhamye Nathan

RESILIENTAFRICA NETWORK
The presenter is a health services researcher at Makerere University school of public health with 3 year experience in operational research and teacher and one year in resilience research


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Reclaiming community resilience toward a more effective approach to aid - Kathy Duryee
Reclaiming community resilience toward a more effective approach to aid
Presenter: Kathy Duryee (Australian National University, Australia)
Introduction: What is community resilience, who defines it and how do communities become more resilient? Much of community resilience aid policy and practice focuses on human/environmental relationships, with frameworks for livelihood and food strategy in cyclical drought just one example of recent trends. 
Methods: My approach is to consider and include environmental disaster parameters where relevant, but to expand beyond their confines to reflect the larger complexity of contributors and obstacles to resilience across the community system, inclusive of any context or culture. This paper reviews the academic literature around promotive factors, protective factors and competencies, and draws on 10+ years of experience working in myriad aid contexts globally: 1) to reclaim community resilience as a more comprehensive lens than disaster management alone; and, 2) to propose an emergent methodological approach for partnering with communities to address their resilience goals—free of pre-determined criteria.
Findings: The findings will suggest that by recognizing communities as systems, by acknowledging resilience as an ongoing process, by shifting toward community-centered decision-making and action, and by utilizing emergent findings on which to base policy and programming, aid will enhance its efficacy in supporting communities to become more resilient.  

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Duryee

Kathy Duryee

PhD candidate/NGO consultant, Australian National University
I am an aid practitioner, currently back in school to marry my 20+ years of experience with academia to develop a community resilience model for informing aid policy and programming. A few key words: work: humanitarian aid, community resilience, NGOs, M&E my research: systems... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Resilience and Self-Criticism - Antonia Werner (for Dr. Ana Nanette Tibubos)
Resilience and Self-Criticism
Presenter: Antonia Werner (Goethe University, Germany)
Co-Author: Ana Nanette Tibubos,  Sonja Rohrmann,  Neele Reiß
Introduction: Self-criticism is experienced as an inner voice, which comments on one’s own behavior or feelings. Depending on its degree, it can be adaptive or maladaptive. We investigated the relation of dispositional resilience and similar trait concepts such as self-compassion and self-esteem with self-criticism.
Methods: A sample of 99 students (age M=22.97, SD=5.21) participated in our study with an experimental design using a success-failure-paradigm. Participants were asked to solve anagrams and were given false feedback in order to evoke self-critical thoughts. Their verbalized self-criticism was audio-taped. The evaluation of self-criticism was based on a mixed-method approach, combining qualitative and quantitative analyses. The severity of self-criticism was rated based on its emotional impact of self-directed anger by five trained raters. Dispositional measures were assessed via questionnaires. The association of situational self-criticism and dispositional resilience, self-esteem, and self-compassion were analyzed by using correlational methods.
Findings: Dispositional resilience was statistically not related to the severity of self-criticism operationalized by self-directed anger. However, dispositional self-compassion and self-esteem, which are positively associated with trait resilience, are negatively correlated with self-criticism in our experiment. Our findings have important implications for the construct validity of resilience as personality trait.   

Speakers
AW

Antonia Werner

PhD student, Goethe University, Frankfurt


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Resilience facing internalized homophobia: different adaptation profiles of homossexuals Brazilian - Normanda Araujo de Morais
Resilience facing internalized homophobia: different adaptation profiles of homossexuals Brazilian 
Presenter: Normanda Araujo de Morais (Universidade de Fortaleza, Brazil)
Co-Author: Aline Nogueira de Lira
Introduction: The internalization of homophobia is one of the main risk factors experienced by the LGB people and may have negative effects on their health. The aim of this study was to identify adaptation profiles in relation to the process of internalization of homophobia in a sample of Brazilian homossexuals. 
Methods: The sample consisted of 244 participants (M = 30.70 years old, SD = 8.05) residents in three Brazilian State capitals-Fortaleza (64.8%), Aracaju (24.6%) and Uberaba (8.2%) who self-declared gays (53.7%) and lesbians (45.5%). The scales of internalized homophobia and marital satisfaction scale (GRIMS) and the General Health questionnaire (QSG) were used. Cluster analysis revealed four adaptive patterns: resilient (n = 89); barely adapted (n = 27); competent (n = 81) and vulnerable (n = 47).
Findings: The results suggest that an adaptive profile in relation to health and marital satisfaction may reveal resilience processes among sexual minorities who have experienced internalized homophobia. Moreover, they corroborate the importance of studies on protective factors which are tempering the impact of risk on the developmental results of LGBs.   

Speakers
NA

Normanda Araujo de Morais

University of Fortaleza


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Resilience in Costa Rica: Validation of the Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM) - Rachel Renbarger
Resilience in Costa Rica: Validation of the Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM)
Presentation: Rachel Renbarger (Baylor University, USA)
Co-Authors: Grant Morgan, Tracey Sulak  
Introdction: Many scales exist to measure the construct of resilience. Considering the fact there are few studies corroborating the findings of the few, published resilience scales, more needs to be done to establish which scales the top of the list, especially for those directly for youth populations. 
Methods: The convenience sample of five school sites (n=313) were selected based on established relations with the researchers and the coordinator in Costa Rica. Ages ranged from twelve to 23 in accordance with the Child and Youth Resilience Measure manual. Due to time constraints, only the 28-item Likert-type survey was administered. Despite evidence supporting the tenability of the MCAR assumption, multiple imputation was employed using fifty replications in Mplus (v.7.11) to further minimize the potential effect of missing data. Using the imputed datasets, we ran a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to examine the previous factor structure. 
Findings: There was little variability in item responses, with participants answering positively for the majority of responses. The three factors differ only slightly from the original structure, providing construct validity for the CYRM-28. Correlations between subscales ranged from .635 and .912 indicating a moderate to strong relationship.  

Speakers
RR

Rachel Renbarger

Baylor University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Resilience in rural college communities – indigenous young women negotiate for better protection against gender-based violence - Deidre de Villiers
Resilience in rural college communities – indigenous young women negotiate for better protection against gender-based violence.
Presenter: Deidre de Villiers (NWU, South Africa)
Introduction: By using visual participatory methods to identify and negotiate as a collective group for resources and to be better protected from gbv, a discourse of collaboration ensued.  The effectiveness of using participatory methods was clear but the outcome of the collaborative discourse will only be identified during the 2017 year.   
Methods: The participants(7) used a visual participatory method, particularly ‘draw and talk’; action briefs and making a no-editing required video.  The visual participatory method created a platform with which these young women could clearly articulate and this allowed them to identify various protective mechanisms which are available within their socio-ecological system, including self-defence classes, requesting a social media platform for discussions and support, community groups as a platform to teach these young women life skills and focus group discussions.
Findings: By using visual participatory methods to identify and negotiate as a collective group for resources and to be better protected from GBV, a discourse of collaboration ensued.  The effectiveness of using participatory methods was clear but the outcome of the collaborative discourse will only be identified during the 2017 year.  

Speakers
DD

Deidre de Villiers

Student - North West Uni South Africa


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Resilience of Russian adolescents from single-parent families - Konstantin Zuev
Resilience of Russian adolescents from single-parent families
Presenter: Konstantin Zuev (Institute of Psychology of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia)
Co-Author: Irina Zueva  
Introduction: Divorce is a strong psychological trauma that affects the development of children. In Russia, about every third marriage ends in divorce. Our hypothesis is that the resilience of adolescents depends on the type of family (single or two-parent) and parenting styles at the same time.
Methods: A sample 356 adolescents was used from Moscow consisting of 66 boys and 78 girls from single-parent families. The adolescents completed the questionnaires: ADOR (parenting styles), and the locus of control questionnaire, Personal Sovereignty Questionnaire (PSQ-2010) Statistical treatment. A two-way ANOVA was conducted with the following independent variables: Type of family (single or two-parent) and parental styles, and the following dependent variable: Adolescents resilience (the locus of control Personal Sovereignty) 
Findings: The high level of directivity, hostility and inconsistency of mothers repressed sovereignty. The high level of positive interest in the mothers increased the level of sovereignty. The difference between adolescents from single-parent and two-parent families was revealed only when mothers showed high-level of directivity or low level of positive interest.   

Speakers
KZ

Konstantin Zuev

Institute of Psychology of Russian Academy of Sciences


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Resilience Process of Family Caregivers of Leukemic Patients: Study in the Brazilian Midwest - Sebastiao Benicio da Costa Neto
Resilience Process of Family Caregivers of Leukemic Patients: Study in the Brazilian Midwest
Presenter: Sebastiao Benicio da Costa Neto (Universidade Federal de Goiás; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Goiás, Brazil)
Co-Author: Mariana Costa Brasil  
Introduction: The family caregivers of people with some chronic illness face different challenges during the patient's treatment. This research aimes to describe and understand how the resilience process takes place in family caregivers from patients with lymphatic or myeloid leukemia, whether or not it's acute or chronic. 
Methods: The study is a qualitative study, with quantitaty variations, series cases, descriptive and exploratory. Participants were 14 family caregivers who were attending leukemia patients, 10 were female and 4 were male, hospitalized in a university hospital in the State of Goiás, Brazil. Age ranged from 20 to 69 years. The following instruments were used: Sociodemographic questionnaire, interview script, coping strategies, and inventory of Folkman and Lazarus (IEC), adapted for Brazil by Savóia, Santana and Mejias (1996).
Findings: Among the main results, it was perceived that adequate social support, feeling of   belonging to the family group and having an organized relationship with the patient are factors that contribute to the process of resilience.   

Speakers
SB

Sebastião Benicio da Costa Neto

Universidade Federal de Goiás; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Goiás (BRAZIL)


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Resilient Parenting in Canadian Aboriginal and Latin American communities: A qualitative study of the role of culture - Kayla Hamel
Resilient Parenting in Canadian Aboriginal and Latin American communities: A qualitative study of the role of culture 
Presenter: Kayla Hamel (York University, Canada)
Co-Author: Leah Litwin, Yvonne Bohr  
Introduction: Minority groups in Canada face multiple stressors which can negatively influence family mental health. Despite an overwhelming focus on the negative effects of risk factor exposure, the literature of late has shifted to boosting resilience. Culture and its influence on resilience within diverse groups is a growing area of research. 
Methods: This study used qualitative methods to examine parenting resilience in two samples of mothers in Toronto: 1) Canadian Aboriginal mothers, a group that often contends with significant stressors at multiple levels, including marginalization and discrimination, and 2) Latin American immigrants, who face risk factors such as trauma exposure and poverty both before and after immigrating to Canada. Eighteen Aboriginal mothers and 32 Latin American immigrant mothers were interviewed about traumatic experiences and their subsequent impact on parenting in the context of their culture. Thematic analysis was used to identify salient themes in the mothers’ interviews. 
Findings: Findings underscored the importance of cultural beliefs as a source of resilience and add to our understanding of family resilience in minority groups in Canada. Building a knowledge base of culture-specific parenting strengths can foster the development of culturally-informed parenting programs, and help inform policy in marginalized and vulnerable groups.   

Speakers
KH

Kayla Hamel

York University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Risk and protective factors for School Staff in relation to resilience building interventions - Josie Maitland
Risk and protective factors for School Staff in relation to resilience building interventions
Presenter: Josie Maitland (Brighton Univeristy, UK)
Co-Author: Suna Eryigit-Madzwamuse, Angie Hart, Philip Haynes
Introduction:  An ecological perspective to resilience considers the impact of both proximal and distal environment factors on children and young people. This is especially true in the school context. This study aims to investigate the potential factors within the school system that improves staff resilience.
Methods:  Data is being collected from 15 schools in a local area in the North of England as part of a larger resilience focused project during Oct-Dec 2016. All school staff (both teaching and non-teaching) are invited to complete an online survey asking about their knowledge of resilience and their perception of school as an organization using the School Organisational Health Questionnaire. It assesses school and staff characteristics such as morale, excessive work demand, participative decision-making, professional interaction, supportive leadership, school-community relationship, appraisal and recognition, goal congruence, and work connection. Descriptive data will be analyzed during January-March 2017.  
Findings: This presentation will report the findings from the staff surveys in relation to resilience knowledge of staff and their perception of school as an organization. Findings from this study will contribute to a growing understanding of change and reform within school systems, particularly in relation to resilience building interventions.

Speakers

Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Social mobility: Equity and resilience - a research program - Ida Skytte Jakobsen
Social mobility: Equity and resilience - a research program 
Presenter: Ida Skytte Jakobsen (Univerty college lillebealt, Denmark)
Co-Authors: Thomas Engsig, Anne Marie Villumsen
Introduction: National Research Centre for Vulnerable Children and Youth NUBU is a new collaboration between the all the seven independent University colleges in Denmark. The aim of NUBU is to strengthen and unifying , practice-oriented profession and relevant solutions to societal challenges in the field of Vulnerable Children and Youth. 
Methods: We would like to present the first research program in the center: Social mobility: Equity and resilience. The research program Social mobility: Equity and resilience focuses on creating knowledge about the factors and processes that constitute the conditions for equity and resilience in schools, day care and educational practice. This application-oriented knowledge can contribute to the professions' work to create educational social mobility for children and young people in day care and school. 
Findings: the research program's intention to create systematized knowledge of the various barriers that prevent schools, day care and educational practice creates resilience and is characterized by equity, where differences in child and adolescent development, learning and wellbeing is not due to social background.  

Speakers
avatar for Ida Skytte Jakobsen

Ida Skytte Jakobsen

Associate Professor, University College Lillebealt
I am trained as a clinical psychologist and has taught at the School of social work alongwith working with childred at risk. I did my PhD on how traditional risk research design can inclued a resiliency perspective. Right now I work with the significance of the inclusion agenda for... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Social Resilience in Danish Schools - Jeppe Kiel Christensen
Social Resilience in Danish Schools
Presenter: Jeppe Kiel Christensen (Aarhus University, Denmark)
Introduction: In an investigation of the increasing consensus that resilience can be learned and developed, the poster focuses on Danish schools’ opportunities to create and retain strengthening and supportive environments. A special focus will be on the collaboration with Save the Children Denmark and the learning material STRONG TOGETHER.
Methods:  The project consists of a literature review and fieldwork, which together form the basis of a study in Nordic Social Resilience. The literature review consists of Nordic initiatives/theories, describing the work with social resilience thus far. 
Findings:  The poster will display the current design and regional specific assumptions on Nordic Social Resilience. An explanation on the theory and practical knowledge behind STRONG TOGETHER as well as initial findings from pilot-school interviews and workshops. A follow up presentation at PTR V is planned, so comments are encouraged.

Speakers
avatar for Jeppe Kiel Christensen

Jeppe Kiel Christensen

PhD Fellow, Aarhus University - Denmark
As a teacher and master in educational psychology, Jeppe has been engaged within the educational sector in both Denmark and internationally. Among other things Jeppe worked as strategy partner with 100 Resilient Cities and as a development consultant within the Danish Ministry of... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Suggesting an integrative (resilience and systems based) psychodynamic model to work with students with social-emotional and behavioural problems within school context - Elias Kourkoutas
Suggesting an integrative (resilience and systems based) psychodynamic model to work with students with social-emotional and behavioural problems within school context
Presenter: Elias Kourkoutas (University of Crete, Greece)
Co-Authors: Wassilis Kassis, Albertus Johannes (Johan) Botha
Introduction: Children in elementary schools with social, emotional and behavioral problems are three times more likely to be suspended or expelled than their peers. Almost 50 percent of adolescents in high school with social, emotional and behavioural problems drop out of school. Children’s social, emotional and behavioural problems represent a complex phenomenon which challenges traditional psychiatric approaches and calls for the adoption of innovative conceptual frameworks and systematic and coordinated efforts from all stakeholders and experts. A considerable shift in school-psychology practice and research has been realized during the last decade. The strength-based approach represents a shift from medical and individual-based models of treatment to more systemic, resilience-based and less expertise-oriented approaches, which foster families’, schools’ and teachers’ potential and focus on positive aspects of their functions. A similar strength-based model integrating psychodynamic thinking and practice and innovative art-based/ therapy techniques has been implemented within school context to support students with various social-emotional and behavioral problems. Psychodynamic thinking allows counsellors and teachers to go beyond the child’s symptomatic reactions and see the “real” child and his/her family behind the problem behavior. Resilience in this study is considered in terms of “self-protective mechanisms” and is conceptualized from a systemic perspective, rather than an individualist-trait perspective.
Methods: The study draws on a mixed quantitative and qualitative method to evaluate the outcomes of this (pilot) innovative intervention program. The sample of the study included 17 students (8-13 years old) indentified as suffering from mild to more serious social emotional and behavioral problems. Six individual sessions with each student were held during a whole academic year. Sessions with parents and teachers have also been conducted.
Findings: Results of the evaluation process showed significant improvement in most children (14) in behavioral, interpersonal, and academic domains. A detailed analysis of the results will be presented. The discussion section will focus on analyzing what works and why it works in this program. Barriers and limitations of implementing such programs will be analyzed.  

Speakers
EK

Elias Kourkoutas

UNIVERSITY of CRETE
Prof. Dr. at University of Crete Elias E. Kourkoutas is currently Professor of Psychology and Special Education and Chairman of the Educational Psychology Division, as well as of the European funded Practicum Program in Special Education in the Department of Primary Education at... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

The role of services in facilitating the resilience of unaccompanied asylum seeking minors - Ebony King
The role of services in facilitating the resilience of unaccompanied asylum seeking minors
Presenter: Ebony King (Griffith University, Australia)
Introduction:  Guided by a social-ecological approach to the resilience of unaccompanied asylum seeking minors (UAMs), this study analyses the role of service providers in connecting UAMs to the “seven tensions” identified by Ungar and colleagues (2008) in the International Resilience Project and which are associated with positive adaptation. Recognizing that UAMs face significant and varied challenges without the support of parents, family or established social networks, services should not only provide access to basic material resources, but also nurture UAMs resilience through facilitating mental health-enhancing experiences that foster positive development and outcomes after significant adversity. This study is the first to investigate the relationship between service provision and the social-ecological facilitation of resilience among UAMs in Australia.
Methods:  This is a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews and focus groups with both former-unaccompanied asylum seeking minors (aged 18 – 30 years) and service providers. In total, 10 service providers and 12 former UAMs were interviewed and four focus groups were conducted with former UAMs in Victoria, Australia. This study employed a grounded theory approach (with constructivist advances) to data collection and analysis.
Findings:  Three key findings have emerged from preliminary analyses. First, at the level of political ecology, the ability of UAMs physical and social ecologies to provide resources necessary to meet their needs is significantly shaped by distal decisions in policy, legislative, economic and social systems in the context of anti-asylum-seeker (and more specifically, ‘boat people’) political and public sentiment. Second, the quality of service provision was inconsistent across services and within the UAM cohort, which related to issues at the level of macro-, meso- and micro-systems. UAM perspectives reveal that high-quality support from services, programs and community organisations opens-up opportunities to experience the mental health-enhancing experiences associated with positive adaptation in contexts of adversity. Supportive relationships with case workers, teachers, and youth workers not only provided access to material resources, but encouraged the development of positive self-identify, facilitated participation in cultural traditions, provided experiences of social justice and a sense of cohesion with others. The third theme to emerge from the data was the highly agentic nature of UAMs, as they described actively navigating towards the resources that enhanced a sense of wellbeing and which worked towards their goals of educational attainment, contributing to their communities and supporting family members who remained in dangerous situations overseas. Together, these preliminary findings support a multi-systemic, multilevel, political-social-ecological model of resilience that can inform a deeper understanding of the processes that contribute to the resilience of unaccompanied asylum seeking minors.

Speakers
avatar for Ebony King

Ebony King

PhD Candidate, Griffith University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

The state of African resilience: Understanding dimensions of vulnerability and adaptation-a report from ResilientAfrica Network (RAN) - Julius Ssentongo
The state of African resilience: Understanding dimensions of vulnerability and adaptation-a report from ResilientAfrica Network (RAN)
Presenter: Julius Ssentongo (Makerere University School of Public Health-ResilientAfrica Network (RAN), Uganda)
Co-Authors: WIlliam Bazeyo, Olalekan Abdulwahab Ayo-Yusuf, Roy William Mayega, Ky Luu 
Introduction: Sub-Saharan Africa has registered substantial economic gains however these are constantly threatened by several disasters. For instance, East Africa is grappling with the effects of climate variability such as drought and floods while in Southern Africa, HIV/AIDS pandemic adds a layer of hardship on already poor and food insecure households.
Methods: The qualitative data collection process was modeled on a methodology established and tested by Tulane University’s Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy. Using a resilience assessment framework, qualitative interviews were conducted though Focus Group Discussions and Key Informant Interviews with selected stakeholders including development partners and the affected communities among others. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and latent content analysis was done to distill the causes of vulnerability as well as coping and adaptive capacities of the communities to the different shocks/stresses. The data was condensed into dimensions of resilience and these were subsequently used to construct the priority pathways to resilience. 
Findings: Nine dimensions were generated and these holistically describe the resilience of the surveyed communities across sub-Saharan Africa. The dimensions include: wealth, health, infrastructure, human capital, social capital/networks, governance, psychosocial, natural resources, and security. These dimensions have been further quantitatively studied and have informed the second state of Africa resilience report.  

Speakers
avatar for Julius Ssentongo

Julius Ssentongo

Program Coordinator, Makerere University School of Public Health-ResilientAfrica Network (RAN)
Dr. Julius Ssentongo is a Research Fellow at the ResilientAfrica Network (RAN) at Makerere University School of Public Health. His current research focuses on examining the resilience of communities that are contending with the effects of climate change and chronic conflict. He primarily... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Understanding of resilience in adults with a history of child labor- Aline Madia Mantovani
Understanding of resilience in adults with a history of child labor
Presenter: Aline Madia Mantovani (Universidade Estadual Paulista/UNESP, Brazil)
Co-Authors: Renata Maria Coimbra 
Introduction: The present study aims to understand the resilience processes in adults with a history of child labor through the analysis of the reason that contributed to this insertion in work and withdrawal from school, as well as social support available in their contexts for the development of resilience processes.
Methods: A total of 131 adults, of both sexes, participated in the empirical research of two Brazilian institutions; A questionnaire, semi-structured interviews and visual methods (photographs) were used. It was adopted as a theoretical perspective to understand the resilience at the interface with adult life and child labor from the understanding of the personal, inter-relational and cultural aspects present in the life of the participants. 
Findings: In this way, the influence of culture, context and personal characteristics in the construction of strengthened identities, despite the work carried out in childhood/adolescence, is discussed.

Speakers
AM

Aline Mantovani

Educator, graduated from Universidade Estadual Paulista - Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCT/UNESP) in 2008. Master in Education from this university in 2012 and a doctoral student in the Graduate Course in Education also by FCT/UNESP, focusing on child labor and resilience in adults with... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Understanding the influence of risk and protective factors on DRC refugee youth in Durban - Kassa Barakamfitiye
Understanding the influence of risk and protective factors on DRC refugee youth in Durban
Presenter: Kassa Barakamfitiye (University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa)
Introduction: The research was conducted on 8 DRC refugee youth living in Durban. They explained the different risk and protective factors in which they live with and are exposed to daily.
Methods: The study forms a smaller part of a larger research project. This study used a qualitative approach. A sample size of 8 participants were conveniently and purposively chosen from the larger project. Data collection took the form of one on one interviews, the data was analyzed using thematic analysis.
Findings: Participants reported that they face a number of challenges including xenophobia and economic difficulties. They also reported have support structures that help them cope with challenges.  


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Understanding the Relationship between Resilience and Posttraumatic Growth in New Orleans Mental Health Responders Working in a Post-Hurricane Katrina Environment - Carol Tosone
Understanding the Relationship between Resilience and Posttraumatic Growth in New Orleans Mental Health Responders Working in a Post-Hurricane Katrina Environment 
Presenter: Carol Tosone (New York University Silver School of Social Work, USA)
Introduction: There is some conceptual ambiguity between Resilience and posttraumatic growth (PTG) in the professional literature. This study aimed to provide further clarity by examining the relationship between Resilience and PTG in a group of New Orleans Mental Health Responders (N=219) personally and professionally exposed to Hurricane Katrina.
Methods: Findings indicate that the correlation between Resilience and PTG is, as expected, positive and statistically significant albeit modest (r = .15, p = .024). When controlling for variables associated with Resilience and PTG respectively, Compassion Satisfaction has the greatest overlap. Primary/Secondary Shared Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress, and Compassion Fatigue exhibit moderately strong relationships to Resilience but rather weak relationships to PTG. Conversely, the two remaining control variables, Life Events and Shared Trauma/Professional Posttraumatic Growth, exhibit stronger relationships to PTG than to Resilience.  
Findings: These findings support the interrelationship of resilience and posttraumatic growth, but suggest that each have specific variables more associated with one than the other. These findings have conceptual and clinical implications, contributing further clarity to the debate as to whether PTG is a form of Resilience or a distinct construct.

Speakers
CT

Carol Tosone

New York University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

Using a resilience lens in collaborative realist evaluation: what supports role resilience and supportive relationships at the early career phase.- Angie Hart (for Caroline Hudson)
Using a resilience lens in collaborative realist evaluation: what supports role resilience and supportive relationships at the early career phase.
Presenter: Angie Hart (University of Brighton, UK,)
Co-Author: Caroline Hudson, Dr Suna Eryigit-Madzwamuse,
Introduction:  This study reports on a collaborative realist evaluation of role resilience and supportive relationships in which co-researchers, namely Newly qualified (NQ) nurses (preceptees) and experienced nurses (preceptors) joined separate co-inquiry groups. The aim of the study was to better ‘the odds’ for NQ and preceptors in future preceptorship experiences.
Methods:  The initial programme theory emerges inductively from the NQ and preceptor co-inquiry discourse, including 10 NQ and 5 preceptors. Examination of contextual effectiveness is presented in a first phase of ‘theory gleaning’ (Manzano 2016) from co-researchers explanatory accounts of their preceptorship experiences. This includes: i) the adversity, ii) overcoming adversity iii) the conditions that shape role resilience, their ‘resilient moves’ and iv) aspirations for preceptorship, from both groups of NQ and preceptors. Validity of the qualitative data was scrutinised by the co-researchers, in an iterative process to realise contextual adversity, enabling mechanisms, actual and ‘potential mechanisms of action.’
Findings:  Using a social justice resilience approach during data collection highlighte and identified not only, ‘what works, for whom and under what conditions,’ (Pawson & Tilley 2004:2) but their change orientation. Using a resilience lens in realist evaluation moves beyond traditional realist methods to elicit mechanisms that may otherwise have remained dormant. 

Speakers
avatar for Angie Hart

Angie Hart

University of Brighton / Boingboing
Angie Hart is Professor of Child, Family and Community Health at the University of Brighton and has been working on resilience research and practice for 10 years. She is an advisor to England’s Big Lottery Fund, Angie runs boingboing, a not for profit undertaking resilience research... Read More →


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

18:00

We are SISU! Teachers promoting social-ecological resilience of first graders in rural South Africa when starting school - Carlien Kahl
We are SISU! Teachers promoting social-ecological resilience of first graders in rural South Africa when starting school.
Presenter: Carlien Kahl (North-West University, Vaal Campus, South Africa)
Co-Authors: Itumeleng (Tumi) P. Khumalo, Dineo Agnes Ngwanya, Setlheuno Rebecca Segopolo, Moipone Stella Gill, Kesenogile Betty Dikana
Introduction: To illustrate how teachers supported resilient school transitioning of first-grade children living in a structurally deficient, rural community in South Africa. Teachers are well-established as invaluable to children’s positive school adjustment. Their contributions cannot be sustained in isolation and need inputs from social ecologies especially in scarce resource contexts.
Methods: Five case study children were selected using local community advisory panel criteria. These cases formed part of the 'Social ecologies of resilience among at-risk children starting school in South Africa and Finland: A visual participatory study' (in short the SISU project). Draw-and-talk, Photo elicitation, Day-in-the-life video methodology, and interviews with children and their parents and teachers were applied to explain who and what facilitated resilient school transitioning and how, despite structural deficiencies. Independent researchers conducted inductive iterative analysis to develop a codebook used for further deductive coding within and across cases. Consensus discussions and external review finalised analyses.
Findings: Teaching effectively despite classroom overcrowding, limited educational resources, and structural limitations, required creative teaching practices to promote positive first-grade adjustment: teaching core curriculum effectively through facilitated socio-emotional support among peers; engaging children in activities promoting autonomy; and facilitated individual/group learning to accommodate resource limitations. We explicate practical recommendations and limitations. 

Speakers
avatar for Carlien Kahl

Carlien Kahl

North-West University


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa