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Please note that there are two different conference venues:
June 14/15 - Century City Conference Centre
June 16 - Kirstenbosch Conference Centre (transportation available)
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Wednesday, June 14 • 18:00 - 20:00
Developmental cascades between mental health and academic attainment in late childhood - Neil Humphrey

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Developmental cascades between mental health and academic attainment in late childhood
Presenter: Neil Humphrey (University of Manchester, UK)
Co-Authors: Margarita Panayiotou
Introduction: Developmental cascades research explores how functioning in one domain is related to functioning in other domains over time. We examine such longitudinal relationships between emotional symptoms, conduct problems, and reading performance. Three hypotheses are tested — adjustment erosion, academic incompetence, and (cumulative) shared risk.
Methods: Participants were 1842 children (aged 8-9; 979 male, 863 female) drawn from 16 schools in England. Mental health (emotional symptoms, conduct problems - teacher SDQ) and academic attainment (reading - InCAS) data were collected on an annual basis for 3 years. Cumulative shared risk data comprised: familial poverty (free school meal eligibility), neighbourhood deprivation (index of deprivation affecting children), special educational needs (school records), disengagement from school, and lack of social/peer support (KidScreen 27). Data were analysed using cross lag, multi-level structural equation models. Analyses suggested that gender moderated cascade pathways, so separate models were produced for males and females.
Frindings: After accounting for temporal stability, data clustering, within-time co-variance, and cumulative shared risk, the female model supported the academic incompetence hypothesis (e.g. difficulties in reading predicting later increases in emotional symptoms). The male model supported the adjustment erosion hypothesis (e.g. conduct problems predicting later reductions in reading scores).   

Speakers
NH

Neil Humphrey

University of Manchester


Wednesday June 14, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Century City Conference Centre Western Cape Town, South Africa

Attendees (3)